My digital foundations #2

It’s time to set some principles to support the choices you are making for your personal digital architecture. This second instalment of digital foundations will help you extend your architecture to protect your digital content and assets.

In the first instalment of My digital foundations #1 we established a foundation identity and managed the passwords that are ubiquitous to our digital lives. Now we can build on this identity and start to manage our content.

Some principles

Everyone talks about the cloud. This is really no more than moving your data to someone else’s servers and accessing the content through the Internet. The advantages of using the cloud are just as applicable to all our digital lives as it for the organisations that you work for or with.

Moving to the cloud does not mean that content isn’t also being stored locally. It does mean, however, that all content is stored remotely and sometimes replicated locally. The best three examples of content to make sure are properly in the cloud are the files you keep in folders, your digital media (sometimes in folders and sometimes within a media app) and your email.

You also want to ensure that precious digital content is not exposed to a single hit attack. You may be feeling particularly secure because your lifetime of photos is sitting on a cloud drive, secure both on the hard drives of your computer and the server of your provider. Imagine, however, what happens if you get attacked by malware that locks or otherwise scrambles your hard drive (or even just a family member hitting “delete”). Before you know it, the server copy has also been lost or scrambled.

Some cloud services offer version history, which would be a fall-back. A better alternative is to have a physical copy of precious content as well as the cloud version. The physical copy can sit in any location while the virtual copies are protected by the cloud.

Cloud drives and digital media

One of the most important services in your digital life is your cloud drive. There is a plethora of options out there (for example, see Wikipedia’s list of file hosting options).

While most providers do not allow you to have more than one account connected to your device, they do generally allow each account to share folders. For this reason, don’t be tempted to log into the service from work and home using the same account, rather create separate accounts and then share appropriate folders. A similar approach should be applied to each member of your family by creating family folders.

Managing photos and digital media is more complex. Many people are simply overwhelmed by the complexity of downloading the photos and videos from their smartphone. Worse, even if you do work it out, the providers are constantly changing and the approach that works today may not be available tomorrow. It is worth investigating options for cloud based photo and video storage and the associated procedure for downloading images and videos from your device. If you want one approach that will stand the test of time, consider simply using your cloud drive as the primary home of your images and export them to your album product of choice.

Email client

The future of email remains controversial, but it is very likely that it is here to stay (see Email works too well). You should treat email like your paper correspondence (particularly as more and more of your bills and communications end-up in this form). You probably keep a file for your papers with tabs for A to Z and should consider doing something similar for your email folders.

It is also likely that you will end-up with more than one email account that you want to map to your email client. The most common mistake that people make is to leave email on their hard drive by using an email client such as Microsoft Outlook or Mozilla Thunderbird locally.

You need somewhere that you can consolidate email centrally that can also act as a webmail client and central, cloud-based, store that will be persistent for many years. Arguably services such as Yahoo!, Google and Microsoft dominate this space but they are by no means the only providers (see Comparison of webmail providers).

In My digital foundations #1 you chose such a service for your digital network administration. The decision you made then might inform this choice, but it does not have to be the same. Either way, you can choose to map that email account to this service.

With a central store, you are now free to choose an email client. Your one requirement is to ensure you use the IMAP and not POP protocol. The client should leave the email in your central consolidated store. For a list of candidates see Comparison of email clients.

Your architecture

In just two posts, your digital life is supported by a cloud-based network with the potential for numerous participants and elements that manage your most important content. It doesn’t take long before the network is more complex that you can easily visualise without a supporting architecture diagram.

Keeping track of the information flows and making sure that your family is safe will be the subjects covered in the next instalment of “my digital foundations”.

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About infodrivenbusiness

Robert Hillard is the author of Information-Driven Business, available through John Wiley & Sons. Find out more at www.infodrivenbusiness.com. Robert was an original founder of MIKE2.0 which provides a standard approach for Information and Data Management projects. He has held international consulting leadership roles and provided advice to government and private sector clients around the world. He is a Partner with Deloitte with more than twenty years experience in the discipline, focusing on standardised approaches to Information Management including being one of the first to use XBRL in government regulation and the promotion of information as a business asset rather than a technology problem. Find out more at www.infodrivenbusiness.com. The opinions expressed in this blog are entirely his own.
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